A two-week-training in Basic Interpersonal Sign Language by the EYE Foundation is ongoing at the Korle-Bu Teaching hospital in Accra

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Views: 150 Ishmael Junourgh, Accra, Sept 17, 19, Tue, 6:00am A two-week-training in Basic Interpersonal Sign Language by the EYE Foundation is ongoing...

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Ishmael Junourgh, Accra, Sept 17, 19, Tue, 6:00am

A two-week-training in Basic Interpersonal Sign Language by the EYE Foundation is ongoing at the Korle-Bu Teaching hospital in Accra.

The EYE Foundation (Basic Interpersonal Sign Language trainer) established this year (2019) is to ensure quality healthcare delivery among persons with hearing impairment.

According to the CEO of the Foundation, Mr. Isaac Ofori, the teaching hospital records over 1500 patients daily and 250 of the patients are on admission daily, and therefore, the need to improve communication between the medical officers and the patients.

He says the project will improve “quality and inclusive health care for the patients”.

And that so far “the medical officers are doing their best, but the Foundation wants it inclusive and world class standard”.

This is the maiden edition of the project, and the Director is calling on other facilities such as the Akomfo-Anokye Teaching hospital in Kumasi, the Tamale teaching hospital and the Ho teaching hospital to embrace the intervention as well, already the training is underway at the Korle-Bu and the Cape Coast Teaching hospitals.

The CEO said Foundation was established this year (2019) purposely to fill the communication gap between medical officers and patients in the country.

Mr. Isaac expresses hope that in future the various administrations will see the need to pay for the training for their staff instead of allowing them to do so from their personal resources.

A Participant, Mrs. Shirley Boateng Gyasi when interviewed, said nobody could effectively communicate another person’s health condition than the very sick person and therefore it was important for every health personnel to communicate in basic sign language.

Mrs. Gyasi says the patients have the right to know the medicines given to them, the side effect of the medicines and the benefits of the medicines and so there should be effective communication.

Another participant, Daniel N.T. Anang admits the communication gap between the two sides and expresses hope that the gap will improve after the two weeks-training section.

A participant with hearing impairment when interviewed said doctors and nurses could not communicate in basic sign language and if the participated in the project the gap will improve.

He says sometimes “they even abandoned us simple because they cannot communicate with us.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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